Tag Archives: scottish recipe

Scottish Tattie Scones

Aye ye canny beat a tattie scone! …or for those south of the border, potato scones… a bit like Irish potato bread or English potato cakes… only better of course ūüėČ ¬†I only recently discovered that folk on the West coast of Scotland call Potatoes ‘Totties’ rather than ‘Tatties’ as we do on the East coast… so there you go, fact fans! (As a qualified Literacy teacher linguistics never fail to amaze me!)

A Scottish classic, no full breakfast is complete without them… or hangover for that matter! Delicious on a soft bread roll with ketchup or brown sauce, and obligatory Irn Bru! …or my personal favourite – with marmite and avocado – mmm… a marriage made in food heaven, you’ve gotta try it!

The packets of ready made potato scones you get in Scottish supermarkets are already baked so you can eat them cold straight out of the packet, pop them in the toaster or under the grill, or indeed, fry them up in a pan… but making your own is sooo easy and so delicious that everyone can make their own from scratch, so here’s how…

Tattie (Potato) scones:  (makes 12 scones)

Ingredients

  • 400g floury potato (3 medium, peeled and roughly chopped)
  • 50g vegan margarine (approx. 3 tbsp) e.g. Vitalite
  • 75g plain flour (approx. 4.5 tbsp)
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Boil the potatoes in salted water until tender, then drain and mash.
  2. While the potatoes are still warm, stir in the butter.
  3. Add the flour, season with salt and pepper and stir to combine.
  4. Divide the mixture into three and roll out between two sheets of baking paper. (You want the scones to be at least the same thickness as a £1 coin).
  5. Cut your rolled out scone into quarters and gently peel them from the baking paper.
  6. Heat a griddle or frying pan and lightly brush with oil. Place the potato scones in the pan and cook for approx. 2 minutes each side.

Notes

*Try substituting white potato for sweet potato – you’ll likely need to use more flour as sweet potatoes are a lot wetter when cooked.

*The mixture needs to be dough like but not too moist and not overly dry; Try adding 3 tbsp flour to begin with and mixing, then adding more as required.

*To make these gluten free use less flour; gluten free flour tends to absorb more liquid.

*Instead of rolling into a circle and quartering, try rolling into individual rounds or cutting into squares.

*After mixing in the flour, a delicious variation is to add in some grated vegan cheese and spring onion.

*Experiment with other added flavours and seasonings such as turmeric, smoked paprika or chilli pepper for a kick!

*Once rolled, instead of cutting into individual scones, fry or grill gently then top with pizza toppings for a delicious potato pizza base!

 

Scottish Lentil Soup

Lentil soup makes me think of Christmas as we would almost always have this as a starter on Christmas day. But, it’s a staple that lasts all year round… Lentil soup is for life, not just for Christmas… or winter!

My dad’s mum makes thee best lentil soup in the whole wide world. Nothing comes close. And she actually turned 90 today! (Love you gran!) Second best to my gran’s legendary lentil soup is my mum’s, a very close second. I’ve tasted many wonderful lentil soups in my time and theirs are by far and away the top of the lentil soup league.

Mine isn’t bad I have to say, but it’s only based on theirs & there’s something about mums and grans… they just have the magic touch!

Lentil soup is my go-to whenever I’m feeling poorly, it’s the perfect ratios of flavour and comfort with a health boost to boot… up the garlic and onion if you’re feeling under the weather and whack in a chunk of fresh ginger or even a kick of fresh chili to up the immunity boosting factor, or simply have as is, and you’ll be fighting fit in no time.

Definitely one of my all time most favourite ever dishes, I come back to this again and again, because it’s just.too.good! It’s quick and easy to make and you can prepare a big batch on a Sunday to last a couple of day’s worth of lunches or freeze in tubs for later use. See Notes section below for more ideas and suggestions.

The trick to the success of¬†this soup is the texture – i.e. not blended till it becomes a baby food-esque puree like some places serve it (which still tastes delicious, don’t get me wrong) but the texture is the key to this soup being so intriguingly moreish, therefore roughly chopping, grating and mashing will serve this soup, and you, well – leave the blender in the cupboard!

I wasn’t even going to share a recipe for this as it seems so obvious to me but then I thought it fits neatly in with my Scottish food celebration I’ve got going… plus the fact that there are people in this world who have never had the privilege of tasting a Lentil soup in its¬†simple but delicious glory… plus we can safely say it’s up there with my most favourite things to eat, along with macaroni cheese and avocado toast!

I introduce to you, the best lentil soup in the world (well, 3rd place…!)

Ingredients

  • 50 g dried ready to cook red lentils
  • 3 medium¬†carrots or 2 large¬†– half¬†chopped and half grated
  • 4 small white potatoes or 3 medium –¬†half¬†chopped in various sizes / half grated
  • 1 small or 2 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 2 small or 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 160 ml soya milk
  • 500¬†ml vegetable stock
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • A little¬†salt & pepper

Method

  1. Rinse lentils in a sieve.
  2. Fry onions in a little oil before adding the other ingredients OR Place all ingredients in a pan and simmer for 30-40 mins.
  3. Allow to cool a little, then mash roughly with a potato masher for a thicker texture.

Notes

*Soya milk quantity can be reduced and just use water (with a splash of milk stirred in at the end).

*OPTIONAL:

-Add spices for a spiced lentil soup

-To make TARKA DHALL SOUP add cumin, garam massala, ginger, smoked paprika, curry powder, chili/ cayenne pepper and extra garlic.

-Add coconut milk for a creamy taste and flavour

*I often serve mine with a warmed tattie scone (potato bread) for dipping, as pictured, but plain rice, cous cous, quinoa or even pasta is nice stirred in or served on the side.

*For an extra savoury flavour stir in 1/2 tsp marmite/vegemite while cooking and / or 1/2 tsp Bragg’s Liquid Aminos.

*Top with crispy fried mushrooms for a delicious chewy finish

*Also good for for babies aged 10+ months (..feel free to liquidise to a silky consistency!)